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Platonic Thought of the Week: 13

Platonic Thought of the Week: 13

Euthydemus, 290b–c Cleinias: Nothing in the actual skill of hunting goes any further than hunting down and subduing; and whenever hunters subdue whatever they are hunting, they are not able to make use of it: instead the hunters and the anglers hand it over to the...

Platonic Thought of the Week: 12

Platonic Thought of the Week: 12

Socrates: Hermogenes, son of Hipponicus, there is an ancient proverb that “fine things are very difficult” to know about, and it certainly isn’t easy to get to know about names. To be sure, if I’d attended Prodicus’ fifty-drachma lecture course, which he himself...

Platonic Thought of the Week 11

Platonic Thought of the Week 11

Platonic Thought of the Week 11: Euthydemus 289c-290a . . . what if we were to learn the speech-writer’s skill; is this the one we need to acquire if we are to be blessed? I don’t think so, Cleinias objected. On what evidence? said I. I notice, said he, that some...

Platonic Thought of the Week 10

Platonic Thought of the Week 10

Friom Meno, 81a-d Meno: 81A Don’t you think this argument is well formulated, Socrates? Soc: I do not. Meno: Can you say why? Soc: I can: for I have heard about matters divine from wise men and women… Meno: What did they propose? Soc: Something true and beautiful, in...

Plato and Cosmic Truth

Plato and Cosmic Truth

The Cosmic Aspect of Truth in Plato John Dillon   I I must confess to having a long-standing adversative relation with the concept of truth, particularly in philosophical and theological contexts, which I recognize as being unreasonable. It is partly due to...

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