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Platonic Thought of the Week: 15

Platonic Thought of the Week: 15

Phaedrus 273c7-e3 Socrates: Gosh! Tisias, or someone else, whoever he is, and whatever he likes to be named after, has discovered a skill that has been most ingeniously hidden! Yet, my friend, there is something we should say to him, or perhaps not … Phaedrus: What?...

Platonic Thought of the Week: 14

Platonic Thought of the Week: 14

  Socrates: Perhaps it will seem absurd, Hermogenes, to think that things become clear by being imitated in letters and syllables, but it is absolutely unavoidable. For we have nothing better on which to base the truth of primary names. Unless you want us to...

Platonic Thought of the Week: 13

Platonic Thought of the Week: 13

Euthydemus, 290b–c Cleinias: Nothing in the actual skill of hunting goes any further than hunting down and subduing; and whenever hunters subdue whatever they are hunting, they are not able to make use of it: instead the hunters and the anglers hand it over to the...

Platonic Thought of the Week: 12

Platonic Thought of the Week: 12

Socrates: Hermogenes, son of Hipponicus, there is an ancient proverb that “fine things are very difficult” to know about, and it certainly isn’t easy to get to know about names. To be sure, if I’d attended Prodicus’ fifty-drachma lecture course, which he himself...

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